ONE IS FOR THE SUN by Lenore Blegvad

ONE IS FOR THE SUN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

One is for the sun all right, and two might represent day and night skies, but the numbers of the other things are random choices arranged in an artificial progression: three trees, five hills, six roads, seven streams, etc. (""Four is for the winds"" is further complicated, being illustrated not as the points of the compass but as four weathervanes--standing in a bay window of all places.) The book skips from ten (perceivable) to one million (imperceptible), a pleasant conceit if it stopped with one million raindrops; however, four million berries, five million pine cones, six million snowflakes have no mathematical or evocative value and impose an ascension with no basis in reality.

Pub Date: Oct. 9th, 1968
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World