ROME WASN'T BURNED IN A DAY: The Mischief of Language by Leo Rosten

ROME WASN'T BURNED IN A DAY: The Mischief of Language

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sixty examples, with commentary, of linguistic pratfalls including many manifestations of the malapropism, typos and a few mind-busters of uncertain category: ""While he may be poor and shabby, underneath those ragged trousers beats a heart of gold."" From the budding author who ""circulated her navel,"" to the man who ""hadn't laughed like that since his wife died,"" each run-off at the mouth or linotype sports its own credit. And in the concluding list of sources, lo, L*E*O R*O*S*T*E*N's name leads all the rest. Why not, since it was Rosten who (in addition to his proxy sallies to Mr. Parkhurst) tossed up ""None but the brave desert the fair."" To be illustrated by cartoonist Robert Day, and this is fine for the night tipple or the dentist's orifice.

Pub Date: March 10th, 1972
Publisher: Doubleday