THE PRESIDENT WHO WOULDN'T RETIRE by Leonard Falkner

THE PRESIDENT WHO WOULDN'T RETIRE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The President Who Wouldn't Retire is the story of John Quincy Adams' political career after he was defeated by Jackson in his bid for re-election to the presidency in 1828. Elected to Congress in 1831 as an independent, he represented his district in eight successive Congresses for almost seventeen years. By the standards of any age, his performance in Congress was remarkable. He was Consistently opposed to slavery and its extension into recently acquired territories. As early as 1836 Adams made the revolutionary suggestion that in case of ""civil, servile or foreign"" war in the South, slavery might be abolished by military authority; that is, the president or commander could rightly order universal emancipation. A pioneer in civil rights and in the advancement of science, Adams was unique as a CongresSman in that he always debated and acted with complete independence. His extraordinary career is in large measure responsible for whatever interest is generated by Leonard Falkner's popularized study. The flatness of the author's prose is obvious by contrast whenever he quotes the ex-president. Standard reconstruction.

Pub Date: Oct. 19th, 1967
Publisher: Coward-McCann