THE ALLIGATOR'S PROBLEM by

THE ALLIGATOR'S PROBLEM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

...was that he was afraid of the dark. This toughest of all creatures has a charming dialogue with the most fragile--an ant, a successful reversal of innate characteristics. Together, they conversationally explore the beauty of night, the serenity of secure sleep. The images evoked are persuasive. They persuade the alligator, whose attitude remains changed. There isn't much more to the story. The alligator belongs to a lady, who adds nothing by her presence in the minimal plot, not even the comic exaggeration that might have been hoped for. The illustrations are in the slapdash manner of the author/illustrator's first book--The Restless Rabbit, although this time the color is under better control. It is a style ill-suited to the contrast of the gross and the minuscule physical qualities of the creatures involved--the ant is a mouse-sized invention and shares with the grotesque a jelly-doughnut shaped nose.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1966
Publisher: Scribners