THE WOODS WERE FULL OF MEN by

THE WOODS WERE FULL OF MEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In San Francisco, tired of writing unpublished novels and determined to find ob, Irma Lee Emmerson, refreshing her spirit at the zoo, overheard a conversation that sent her ""kiting off to Oregon"" to apply for a position as second cook at the icoma logging camp. After a hiring that was more like a shanghaiing, she found herself in the realm of Old Fox, Wild Bill the cat skinner, Meatball the cook, Snoozy the bull cook (or chief cleaner-upper), and sixty robust loggers who treated her like a lady and expected her to be one. Irma Lee tells what it is like to live as one woman among so many men (for one thing ""they eat too much...twenty pies a day, for example. Three hundred pancakes"") and what it's like to cook for up to 100 men, in particular when an unexpected party of twenty-five bigwigs appear on the scene. She also encounters a passel of characters, including John Paul, a sea-going cook's helper who is haunted and Lucien, whose excursions into haute cuisine generally inensed the loggers; and romance in the person of Edison Smith, who helped her get over Doug Weatherby...A logger's life is not a nappy one as set forth in work and lay and intake. Besides cooking and romance, there is drama for Lee when she faces the company saboteur at a dangerous moment. Fresh baked, enjoyable, escape reading.

Publisher: McKay