BOLA AND THE OBA'S DRUMMERS by Letta Schatz
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BOLA AND THE OBA'S DRUMMERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Bola, the son of a farmer is drawn to the drums, longs to be a drummer, to make the drum talk, to drum the mighty Oba's own dance. Mrs. Schatz sets each scene with a precision and wealth of detail that pulls an American reader into the African world-Bola at the market, following a procession, running through the intricate streets of Ibaden (Nigeria), working at the cocoa harvest, doing his household chores, playing with the village children. Verisimilitude is furthered by the Yoruba -like metaphorical English of the dialogue and the characteristic playfulness, competitive spirit, and mercurial moods of the otherwise unique Africans of the story. How Bola learns to drum and finally becomes an apprentice with his father's approval, playing for the Oba himself, is a well-paced story big enough to stand up for itself, authenticity not a crutch but an added substance. Little girls took to Taiwo and Her Twin; both sexes will like Bola.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1967
Publisher: McGraw-Hill