ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR by Lewis L. Lorwin

ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an important book, intended to make us look backward and forward, to make us weigh the evidence of what the world is like under Nazi domination, under democracy, to make us decide for ourselves where our future lies. It falls into five main sections:-Nazi background, Democracy's background, Consequences of a Nazi victory, Consequences of a Democratic victory, and the factors in post-war readjustment. His basic thesis is that there is no compromise possible between the two worlds of thought, and that there is sufficient evidence already for the world to judge. The section on the Nazi backgrounds is more detailed as to the progress already made towards Hitler's new world order than I have found elsewhere, and he sets this against the roots of Nazism, roots deeper than the present generation now holding the reins. The backgrounds of Democracy are more a survey of the history and basic principles. With this double background, the author analyzes more thoroughly the plans under way for ""Neurope"", particularly in the field of economics, agriculture, industry and finance, world trade keyed to Nazi interest and Nazi policies. He discusses the place of the Axis partners in the set-up, the place of colonies, of U.S.S.R., the place of the U.S. in an Axis world, of Latin America. He analyzes previous plans for Pan European set-ups, showing why they had failed -- and why the already operating Nazi League is seemingly working to Nazi interests. From this he goes on to the imperative necessity of worldwide democratic planning. He shows how Great Britain has already accepted collective action, economic control, ""revolution by consent"". He points to internal dissension in the U.S. between business and the New Deal as evidence that we have not yet faced the future. America's post-war program in the main tends towards a form of reconstructed League of Nations, though he goes into various current plans, weighing their values. His own carefully weighed opinion would prefer the New Deal principles applied to world relations, as he stresses the imperative necessity of social welfare as an integral part of any world post-war program...Much of his material is controversial in character -- it is not very easy reading, but it is challenging and constructive and instructive. A book that might be sold to those who found You Can't Do Business With Hitler a starter.

Pub Date: Oct. 28th, 1941
ISBN: 116451413X
Publisher: Random House