CAN YOU FIND IT? AMERICA

SEARCH AND DISCOVER MORE THAN 150 DETAILS IN 20 WORKS OF ART

This latest entry in the popular Can You Find It? series draws its lively and accessible images from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Between the pages kids will find a wealth of such uniquely American icons as Emanuel Leutze’s Washington Crossing the Delaware, Thomas Hoveden’s affecting The Last Moments of John Brown and Grandma Moses’s homey Thanksgiving Turkey. Lovers of more contemporary art will enjoy sharing The Photographer, by Jacob Lawrence, Red Grooms’s quirky street scene, Chance Encounter at 3 A.M., and textile artist Faith Ringgold’s vibrant Story Quilt. Falken easily embraces the now-familiar by-the-numbers approach to the text: “Can you find 1 saxophone, 4 taxicabs…” etc. While some of the paintings and the “hidden” objects are easier than others to decipher, by book’s end child readers will have become practiced in looking at and thinking about the details among the widely divergent styles and schools of American art, and their grown-ups will have learned a great new way to engage children in the arts. A terrific entry in a reliable, handsome and affordable series. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-8109-8890-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: Dec. 30, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2010

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IGGY PECK, ARCHITECT

A repressive teacher almost ruins second grade for a prodigy in this amusing, if overwritten, tale. Having shown a fascination with great buildings since constructing a model of the Leaning Tower of Pisa from used diapers at age two, Iggy sinks into boredom after Miss Greer announces, throwing an armload of histories and craft projects into the trash, that architecture will be a taboo subject in her class. Happily, she changes her views when the collapse of a footbridge leaves the picnicking class stranded on an island, whereupon Iggy enlists his mates to build a suspension bridge from string, rulers and fruit roll-ups. Familiar buildings and other structures, made with unusual materials or, on the closing pages, drawn on graph paper, decorate Roberts’s faintly retro cartoon illustrations. They add an audience-broadening element of sophistication—as would Beaty’s decision to cast the text into verse, if it did not result in such lines as “After twelve long days / that passed in a haze / of reading, writing and arithmetic, / Miss Greer took the class / to Blue River Pass / for a hike and an old-fashioned picnic.” Another John Lithgow she is not, nor is Iggy another Remarkable Farkle McBride (2000), but it’s always salutary to see young talent vindicated. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-8109-1106-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2007

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A validating and breathtaking next chapter of a Mother Goose favorite.

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AFTER THE FALL (HOW HUMPTY DUMPTY GOT BACK UP AGAIN)

Humpty Dumpty, classically portrayed as an egg, recounts what happened after he fell off the wall in Santat’s latest.

An avid ornithophile, Humpty had loved being atop a high wall to be close to the birds, but after his fall and reassembly by the king’s men, high places—even his lofted bed—become intolerable. As he puts it, “There were some parts that couldn’t be healed with bandages and glue.” Although fear bars Humpty from many of his passions, it is the birds he misses the most, and he painstakingly builds (after several papercut-punctuated attempts) a beautiful paper plane to fly among them. But when the plane lands on the very wall Humpty has so doggedly been avoiding, he faces the choice of continuing to follow his fear or to break free of it, which he does, going from cracked egg to powerful flight in a sequence of stunning spreads. Santat applies his considerable talent for intertwining visual and textual, whimsy and gravity to his consideration of trauma and the oft-overlooked importance of self-determined recovery. While this newest addition to Santat’s successes will inevitably (and deservedly) be lauded, younger readers may not notice the de-emphasis of an equally important part of recovery: that it is not compulsory—it is OK not to be OK.

A validating and breathtaking next chapter of a Mother Goose favorite. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62672-682-6

Page Count: 45

Publisher: Roaring Brook

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2017

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