MAGGIE’S MONKEYS

A family of pink polar monkeys has moved into the refrigerator, and Maggie’s older brother cannot fathom why the entire family is catering to the imagination of his still–thumb-sucking younger sister. But no one will listen to his protests, and Mom simply says, “Sometimes it’s hard to know what’s real.” When he can’t beat them, he joins them, but his imagination is just not up to Maggie’s standards. However sick of monkey business he is, though, when his friends threaten his sister’s peace-of-mind, he become Horton-like and protects both the pink monkeys and his sister. In her children’s debut, Sanders-Wells wonderfully encapsulates the difficulties of being a middle child—simultaneously too old and too young. Carter’s masterful facial expressions reflects this inner battle. Her gouache artwork is done in a bright, tropical palette that emphasizes the imaginative theme. While pink polar monkeys may not exist, what is very real is the love and loyalty of a big brother. A humorous tale sure to make siblings smile, even as they inwardly groan. (Picture book. 3-8)

Pub Date: April 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-7636-3326-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2009

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Daddy-and-child dog lovers can try some of these canine ways of expressing affection.

DADDIES ARE AWESOME

Puppies celebrate the many ways their dads are awesome.

“Daddies are playful. / They swing you around. // You ride on their shoulders / or hang upside down.” The first spread pictures a scruffy pup, mouth clamped on its dad’s tail, hanging. The second features a long dachshund, his four pups using the large expanse of his back as a jungle gym or resting spot. The husky dad is labeled as daring, brave, and strong, while the hound takes his pup on adventures (digging and hiding under a bush). Other dog dads give kisses and tickles, tell bedtime stories and help count sheep (a stuffed toy), and help their pups grow (challenging them with stairs and carrying them when the going gets tough). Lovšin creatively interprets some of the text that applies well to kids but not so well to canines: dad and pup at each end of a long stick held in their mouths is the dog equivalent of holding hands. Though many dog breeds will be familiar, some are just mutts, though all are shown caring for and enjoying the company of their offspring. White backgrounds keep the focus on the dogs.

Daddy-and-child dog lovers can try some of these canine ways of expressing affection. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: May 17, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-62779-452-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: March 16, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2016

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ABUELA

Rosalba imagines how the grandmother who takes her to the park might soar with her over the city (New York), sharing the sights. Since ``Abuela'' speaks ``mostly Spanish,'' Rosalba mentions many Spanish words for what they see, and in their conversations. Though the storyline here is slight, the relationship glows with affection; the Spanish vocabulary is well integrated and clear in context. Kleven's illustrations—jewel- like collages of sparkling images and patterns, crammed with intriguing details—effectively transmit Rosalba's joy in her narrative. Pronouncing glossary. (Picture book. 3-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1991

ISBN: 0-525-44750-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1991

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