TUTUS AREN’T MY STYLE

Emma, whose immediate literary ancestors include Pippi Longstocking and Eloise, is flamboozled when the mailman brings a package from Uncle Leo and it’s a ballerina outfit. Emma’s taste runs more to pirate hats and lizards, but she gamely tries to float and flitter, following the advice of the mailman and stuffy Mrs. Gurkin with bumpy results in the out-of-doors. Inside, supplying her own music with a kazoo, she fares little better, but when Uncle Leo arrives she rolls like a tumbleweed, does cartwheels and taps in her cowboy boots. He’s delighted—and nonplussed, because he meant to send her a safari outfit! Wilsdorf’s watercolor-and–China ink pictures have a lively line, spreading out over double pages and employing sequential vignettes with equal assurance and verve. If the message is a little heavy handed, leaping cats, a peripatetic garden gnome and the red-cowboy-booted Emma’s irrepressible bounce lift it up. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-8037-3212-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: Jan. 21, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

SEE PIP POINT

From the Adventures of Otto series

In his third beginning reader about Otto the robot, Milgrim (See Otto, 2002, etc.) introduces another new friend for Otto, a little mouse named Pip. The simple plot involves a large balloon that Otto kindly shares with Pip after the mouse has a rather funny pointing attack. (Pip seems to be in that I-point-and-I-want-it phase common with one-year-olds.) The big purple balloon is large enough to carry Pip up and away over the clouds, until Pip runs into Zee the bee. (“Oops, there goes Pip.”) Otto flies a plane up to rescue Pip (“Hurry, Otto, Hurry”), but they crash (and splash) in front of some hippos with another big balloon, and the story ends as it begins, with a droll “See Pip point.” Milgrim again succeeds in the difficult challenge of creating a real, funny story with just a few simple words. His illustrations utilize lots of motion and basic geometric shapes with heavy black outlines, all against pastel backgrounds with text set in an extra-large typeface. Emergent readers will like the humor in little Pip’s pointed requests, and more engaging adventures for Otto and Pip will be welcome additions to the limited selection of funny stories for children just beginning to read. (Easy reader. 5-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-689-85116-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2003

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

SKELETON HICCUPS

Who hasn’t shared the aggravation of a whole day’s worth of bone-rattling hiccups? Poor Skeleton wakes up with a deadly case that he can’t shake, and it’s up to his friend Ghost to think of something to scare them away. Cuyler (Stop, Drop, and Roll, 2001, etc.) cleverly brings readers through the ups and downs of Skeleton’s day, from shower to ball-playing. Home folk remedies (holding his breath, eating sugar) don’t seem to work, but Ghost applies a new perspective startling enough to unhinge listeners and Skeleton alike. While the concept is clever, it’s Schindler’s (How Santa Lost His Job, 2001, etc.) paintings, done with gouache, ink, and watercolor, that carry the day, showing Skeleton’s own unique problems—water pours out of his hollow eyes when he drinks it upside down, his teeth spin out of his head when he brushes them—that make a joke of the circumstances. Oversized spreads open the scene to read-aloud audiences, but hold intimate details for sharp eyes—monster slippers, sugar streaming through the hollow body. For all the hiccupping, this outing has a quiet feel not up to the standards of some of Cuyler’s earlier books, but the right audience will enjoy its fun. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-689-84770-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2002

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more