MELISSA'S FRIEND FABRIZZIO by Lisl Well

MELISSA'S FRIEND FABRIZZIO

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Melissa's last day in Venice is a trial: too hot to stay at the beach, not enough liras to ride on the gondola or the vaporetto, lemon ice on her dress, lost on her way to feed the pigeons, and then Fabrizzio--""no ordinary friend,"" a fountain figure. She must give him something special... ""and then she knows!""--her shirt and her hat. In her undershirt and shorts, she skips through the piazza, flees from the pigeons, and falls into the water. A boy fishes her out; Melissa is sure it is her friend Fabrizzio, especially because he has her shirt and hat, and because when he leaves she is holding a sea shell ""just like Fabrizzio's."" We can understand Melissa's misconception: the sudden appearance of two boys with her clothes and of the shell floating where no shell should be have us stumped too. This little souvenir of a stay in Venice is like the slides tourists bring back--precious to them, pointless to their audience.

Pub Date: Aug. 28th, 1967
Publisher: Macmillan