A THRESHOLD IN THE SUN by Lloyd Morris

A THRESHOLD IN THE SUN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a difficult book to define, either as to its very special quality or its market. As I read the text, the closest analogy seemed to be The Education of Henry Adems. Just as Adams used himself as a ""sounding board"" for the theory of education his time, so Morris uses himself (irritatingly in the third person as ""the bey"" or ""Morris"") as a proving ground for the late '90's and early 1900's, in Columbia and in the world of letters. Just as Adams' autobiography is fragmentary biography -- as Lloyd Morris thinly stakes these other factors in his life outside the forces that be considered instrumental is molding a personality and a character. The audience for the book is very specifically a literary can; the interest lies very largely in intimate pictures of educators, literary figures, musical and theatrical figures, who played a vital part in his ""education"": -- John Erakine, Carl Van Doren, Charles Board, James Robinson, ""A B"", Edwin Arlington Robinson, Sarah Bornhardt, Isaders Dusean, , Mrs Edward MacDowell, the Colums, Stein, James Jeyee, west, and many others, in varying degrees. His is an objectively critical mind; he has -- at no time -- accepted opinions ready made, and his book provides a running commentary on of the changing modes in educational and literary and artistic thought. A very definite contribution to literary criticism, to of the passing seems, to appraisal of a social class that belongs to history now. But not a routine autobiography.

Publisher: Harper