WHAT WE EAT: The Origins and Travels of Foods Around the World by Lois S. Johnson

WHAT WE EAT: The Origins and Travels of Foods Around the World

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From Soup to the Peanut and true nuts, all the familiar categories of food digest-ed: their origin and history, the forms and names they take in different countries. Along ""The World's Bread Route"" are croissants (attributed not to France but to a Hungarian victory over the Turks) and graham crackers (after Sylvester Graham, U.S., 1794-1851); under ""Birds of a Feather"" is Henry of Navarre's plan for chicken every Sunday; while ""Always on Sundaes"" discloses that the first were a Sunday-substitute for forbidden ice cream sodas. Also on the menu are rice, hamburgers and hot dogs, fish and seafood, potatoes, tomatoes, vegetables, salads, the olive, spices and seasonings, sugar and other sweeteners, fruit, cheese, and ""The World's Unquenchable Thirst"": milk, chocolate, tea, coffee, soft drinks. Conceived and arranged very like Eberle's Basketful, this is both more succinct and sprightlier: a youngster can read less and enjoy it more.

Pub Date: Nov. 10th, 1969
Publisher: Rand McNally