THE TROUBLE WITH JAMIE by Lorrie McLaughlin

THE TROUBLE WITH JAMIE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When"" they build the biggest ship that ever was, I'm signing on as cabin-boy,' said Jamie. 'If you ever do put out to sea,' said his grandfather,'...you'll have to learn to do as you're told and to use your head, not your tongue, to get you out of scrapes.'"" And when the sweet-talking-est boy in Liverpool, Nova Scotia (1800), finds himself an accidental stowaway, he learns that being a cabin-boy is mostly scrubbing pots and pans and taking orders. The raiding ship returns home at last, laden with prizes; Jamie's family begs him to tell them what happened. ""It was the greatest voyage that ever was,"" he begins...and then he stops: ""And we did our duty."" Like others of the series, this is set in very large type on an open page, making it suitable for uncertain readers; what makes it superior for this group is the rhythmic cadence of the narrative, the humorous repetition of the dialogue, the staccato succession of incidents, the little boy bravado changing to manly responsibility. A real adventure for regular fellers.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1967
Publisher: St. Martin's Press