THE LONGEST AUTO RACE by

THE LONGEST AUTO RACE

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author is 92 and he was the driver of the winning car in the longest auto race in history. At 6 P.M., July 30, 1908, he and his three teammates brought their Thomas Flyer to a stop in front of the offices of Le Matin, the French newspaper that set the prize of $1000. They had raced for 169 days and covered 13,341 miles driving West from New York to Alaska to Japan to Siberia and on through Russia and Germany to France. Horseless carriages were as rare as good roads in those days and the team spent a lot of time repairing the topless, windshieldless Flyer, which took them through the extremes of blizzard cold and desert heat ahead of the six other national entries. An excellent digest history of the race was published for older boys this year -- Jackson's Road Race Round the World (1965, p. 241, J-79). The adult book is of course more detailed and personal and it is also good natured recollection.

Pub Date: Feb. 8th, 1965
Publisher: John Day