GRANDPA AND THE GIRLS by Louis Heyward

GRANDPA AND THE GIRLS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Nobody wants grandpa, a Hungarian, Jewish immigrant in his eighties, to go to Tulsa on a visit to his daughter Dora. For the affluent Dora is involved in the running of an establishment which the Schaeffer elders, in the presence of the Schaeffer children, refer to in only the most veiled terms. But Grandpa, wise in the ways of the Talmud, is determined to find a way, and after considerable maneuverings-- adventure into bootlegging, a brief and catastrophic encounter with the retail grocery business, several schemes of entrepreneurism which drive the local shopkeepers to distraction--he invades his daughter's mirrored place of business. Fortunately for Grandpa, his daughter conceives of him as a latterday Moses, and diligently protects him from too intimate a knowledge of the function of the three ""college girls"", who draped in kimonos, meander through her corridors. Moments of uproarious humor, more moments of nostalgia, invade this book but do not completely counteract the spottiness and exaggeration which render it less than successful.

Pub Date: Feb. 23rd, 1959
Publisher: Random House