AT THE END OF THE OPEN ROAD by Louis Simpson

AT THE END OF THE OPEN ROAD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These clear, cool poems are mostly about America. Rather, they happen largely, and often mysteriously, in an American landscape made up of love, California, Walt hitman, redwoods, Pocahontas, suburbs...and their language is often distilled from risk, factual American conversations. They are, moreover, genuine and moving poems. The simple, almost colloquial language is coupled with a precise compression of phrase, and lightly juxtaposed but revealing images. Free-form, they are strictly controlled nternally. There is a fine long poem about explorers and collectors (""Moving the alls"") and another about Americans talking to an explosives manufacturer on a lawn Italy, both of which, quite differently, set the tone of an awareness which states insights with a seeming casualness. A poetry created by discarding most of the obvious ""oetic"" methods, successfully experimental, wry, vigorous, this is a book to be -read.

Pub Date: Sept. 26th, 1963
Publisher: slevan Univ. Press