SOME DAYS WERE HAPPY by Louis Sobol

SOME DAYS WERE HAPPY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Reminiscences of a Jewish childhood near New Haven, in which the warmth of family life, the close bonds of parents and children, the excitements of new inventions, house, friends, interests are all described in happy remembrance. Mother and her methods of saving; Father and his imperturbability; the kids and their course between home, school, and typical outside activities; the lure of adult worlds as movies, theatre, games, gave way to other signs of growing up, first jobs, ambitions. These are interspersed with the author's contrasting sketches of places, people, incidents of later life. An autobiographical segment that will have an appeal for this columnist's readers. It has some of the values- in a warm appreciation of the qualities in Jewish home life- of Harriet Lane Levy's 920 O'Farrell Street (see P. 210) but doesn't cut as deep.

Pub Date: Aug. 22nd, 1947
Publisher: Random House