THE HARVESTERS: THE STORY OF THE MIGRANT PEOPLE by Louisa R. Shotwell

THE HARVESTERS: THE STORY OF THE MIGRANT PEOPLE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The problem of the migrant agricultural worker has been taxing the intelligence and conscience of governmental and private bodies since the days of Theodore Roosevelt's Country Life Commission in 1909. It is a highly complex human and economic problem that almost defies solution. But progress has been, and is being, made. Miss Shotwell's study presents the private despair, the social, economic and political perplexities of the migrant worker as well as the heartening advances. The format is a sort of ""sandwich"" arrangement in which analyses of the technical aspects of the situation are interspersed with and illustrated by personal stories of ""typical"" migrants and their families. It suffers from rather serious defects, however. The personal stories are a bit sugary, and the analyses are quite slanted against the employers of this type of labor. This division of ""good guys and bad guys"" hurts what is basically a very good story. Where it succeeds it succeeds well. The way of life of the migrant workers, their economic and social entrapment, and the solutions that are being found are excellently presented. It is good, but it could have been better.

ISBN: 0548451354
Publisher: Doubleday