THE NATURAL WORLD OF LOUISE DICKINSON RICH by Louise Dickinson Eich

THE NATURAL WORLD OF LOUISE DICKINSON RICH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Nearly two decades have psed since We Took to the Woods, during which time Mrs. Rich has raised a family, become widowed, left the North Woods to live in other parts of rural Maine, and experienced more of the ""simple life"" about which she writes so well. Her natural world is a charming and comfortable place, if one doesn't mind cutting firewood, shoveling snow, hauling water, or living miles from the nearest neighbors. It is filled with gentle, ingenuous creatures:- importunate bluejays, curious skunks and porcupines, deer who refuse to be frightened out of the garden before they've finished the you planted especially for their delectation. Ecology and the weather play major roles in the life of country folk, and Mrs. Rich offers some amusing observations on how to get along with conditions as you find them. She is a real non-cosmopolite, poking fun at the misconceptions city people have about a mundane existence like hers -- ""A bat in a book is a very different matter from hundreds of bats in your own attic."" But whether she's coping with bats, sharing a berry patch with a wary bear, or racing her dog over a shell strewn beach, her stories have a happy ring to them that should satisfy a lot of nostalgic readers.

Publisher: Dodd, Mead