WRITINGS OF THE YOUNG MARX ON PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY by Loyd D. and Kurt H. Guddat-Eds. Easton

WRITINGS OF THE YOUNG MARX ON PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Marx's early writings have received a lot of attention lately from existentialists, intellectual historians, and Marxist ""revisionists""; some good collections are already available, such as Bottomore's. This one presents the most comprehensive group of selected writings prior to the Communist Manifesto. Many are translated into English for the first time, including excerpts from Marx's doctoral dissertation. The editors have arranged them chronologically, under three headings with a rather dialectical ring: ""Humanitarianism and Liberalism of a Young Hegelian""; ""Feuerbachian Criticism of Hegel""; ""Criticism and Appropriation of Hegel and Feuerbach."" The selections begin with a Gymnasium essay on choosing an occupation, and move on through a wide range of writings on religion, philosophy, alienation, theory of the state, and communism. Some of them (""The Jewish Question,"" ""Theses on Feuerbach"") have been republished time and again, but they will be better understood in this developmental context; and it is exciting to follow a young intellectual's moves from philosophy and political criticism to the belief that institutions are the byproducts of social relations, which themselves depend on economic structures. The editors provide headnotes to the selections, and a long introduction helps the reader unpack Marx's polemical and conceptual labels (""materialism,"" ""real humanism,"" etc.). This specialized edition has wider interest than most, in addition to its tremendous value as a reference work.

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1967
Publisher: Doubleday