THE LIVES AND DEATHS OF A MEADOW by Lucille Wood Trost

THE LIVES AND DEATHS OF A MEADOW

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

How a pond is formed when beavers dam a stream, how it eventually becomes a meadow after the beavers leave, how the area and its population undergo gradual or temporary change until the coming of the white man and his precipitous destruction. First the pioneer and then a farmer set out with disastrous effect to conquer nature and compete with native wild predators; 100 years later a misguided city couple with a ""romantic notion"" buys the property and makes ""artificial changes"" (bulldozing a lake, spraying their cultivated flowers), and finally the meadow, now a city park, is restored by ecology-minded youngsters engaged in a seven-year plan. Trost's repeated reference to the city couple's ""romanticism"" is irritating here -- not only for its scornful tone but also because children are unlikely to understand its meaning in this context. Otherwise, the prose is unobjectionable but rarely vitalized by the sharper, more specific observations of her Fence Lizard (KR, 1972), Brown Bat (KR, 1971) and Cottontail (KR, 1971).

Pub Date: Aug. 2nd, 1973
Publisher: Putnam