THE BELOVED PRISON by Lucy Freeman

THE BELOVED PRISON

A Journey into the Unknown Self
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KIRKUS REVIEW

A sequel to Freeman's Fight Against Fears, summing up and celebrating her continuing years in analysis. Fight Against Fears, published in the early 50's, was a compelling, absolutely honest account of Freeman's psychoanalysis that probably did more than any other popular or academic work to legitimize psychoanalysis in America. Now, here is a report of Freeman's progress since that time, through three more analysts, two marriages, a number of affairs, and a successful career as writer and reporter. With long-term psychoanalysis and Freud himself under attack, Freeman's experience is an example of what might be termed a successful analysis--a long, gradual unfolding to consciousness of the childhood experiences and emotions that shape a personality. From the brutal attack by her second husband that opens the book to the sad death of her mother, and the almost equally sad last hour of analysis, Freeman opens her life and her heart to the reader as she did to her various analysts. In Freeman's revelations, the slow, delicate process has as much appeal as her goal, escaping the "beloved prison" of the past. Constantly intruding, however, are stilted quotes, prefabricated sentences like "You sound like my brilliant, but often ironic, prone-to-tease father," and the nagging doubt as to whether Freeman's family is as interesting to the rest of the world as it is to her. A sensitive account of psychoanalysis, but a question that is not answered here: Were 20 years on the couch really necessary?

Pub Date: May 12th, 1989
ISBN: 312-02866-0
Publisher: St. Martin's
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