THE WONDERS OF FUNGI by Lucy Kavaler
Kirkus Star

THE WONDERS OF FUNGI

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An incredible number of fascinating stories are told as the author details the wonders of fungi and their properties which run the whole range from life giving to death dealing. Whatever its form -- as yeast, mold or mushroom -- it seems that ""the plant that is not green"" has an infinite variety of opposites, i.e. penicillin/; tasty/nauseating; curative/parasitic. A well organized book, this moves from the natural functions of fungi to the uses to which man has learned to put them. There is an introduction to the plans for its uses in the future, particularly on space flight menus. At each point, there is a well told anecdote or legend to make facts memorable. As in her two previous books, The Wonders of Algae (1961, p. 429, J-157) and The Artificial World Around Us (1963, p. 243, J-97) the author again displays her rare talent for making a specialized subject in science read with the verve of good fiction. Neatly drawn black and white sketches.

Pub Date: April 27th, 1964
Publisher: John Day