THE REALM OF THE GREEN BUDDHA by Ludwig Koch-Isenburg
Kirkus Star

THE REALM OF THE GREEN BUDDHA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a lively and colorful account of an expedition to Thailand, undertaken by a noted German zoologist and botanist whose curiosity had been sparked by a pet gibbon named Koko. His stories of adventures capturing birds and animals for private and public zoos are interspersed with a miscellany of information on fauna and flora encountered en route. (He stayed for a time in Burma and spent two weeks in Ceylon on the voyage out.) Dr. Koch-Isenburg had a black panther order from a Rangoon zoo; a botanist friend craved a rare tree-dwelling rhododendron; a childless friend yearned for a tiny pig-tailed monkey; and a tiger he captured wound up in a California private zoo. He describes his hosts the Thais, an exquisitely courteous people, who regarded white as a sacred color since Buddha's mother, by tradition, received her son in the form of a white elephant from heaven. He has a gift of communicating excitement and pleasure equally, as evidenced by his recounting adventures in mountainous northern Thailand, the ""King Cobra"" country, and his frightening experience when Mogul, the tiger, escapes from his cage on the homeward voyage. One can forgive occasional excesses of superlatives and highly colored images, for the smooth translation provided by Richard and Clara Winston. This for animal lovers and armchair travelers.

Pub Date: Nov. 9th, 1963
Publisher: Viking