BUSINESSMAN IN THE STATEHOUSE by Luther H. Hodges

BUSINESSMAN IN THE STATEHOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. Hodges, once Governor of North Carolina and now Secretary of Commerce, examines the developments that took place in his state during his executive tenure. The author writes like a businessman, which may frustrate those who prefer to read the works of a professional pen. The book is lengthy, which will discourage others. On the surface it deals with a subject of limited interest. But it is a work that deserves to be read. The problems of a state are also the problems of a nation -- education, segregation, poverty, labor. The author's account of the industrialization of North Carolina not only illustrates the wisdom of the President's appointment, but provides a helpful case study for students of economics and business. His comments on the 1954 Brown decision and the Little Rock tragedy ably present the position of the Southern moderates. The book is frankly and honestly written. The author does not fight shy of embarrassing and difficult issues. It would be an excellent idea if this admirable openness were imitated by future political autobiographers.

Pub Date: Oct. 6th, 1962
Publisher: Univ. of North Carolina Press