FIELD WITH GEESE by Lyn Irvine

FIELD WITH GEESE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When the rain raineth and the goose winketh,"" quotes the English author of this charming book, ""Little wots the gosling what the goose thinketh."" Nor, she insists, does she herself wot what a goose thinks, which must be almost the only thing she does not know about her own flock. In this ""effort to dispel some of the ignorance about the domestic goose, a bird she loves,"" she tells what she knows. Geese may not have the intelligence with which legend endows them, but they possess an individuality lacking in hens and ducks. They are ""the real artist among grazing beasts,"" cropping grass more efficiently than the horse or the cow. Contrary to popular theory, they do not need water in which to swim. They set their own boundaries and establish their own taboos; long lived and anything but monogamous, they indulge in elaborate mating rituals but when frustrated in love bear no grudges. A book to make even city dwellers think of keeping geese in bathtubs, this is a delightful volume, even for those who are afraid to say ""boo"" to a goose.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1960
Publisher: Morrow