THE RELUCTANT FLOWER GIRL

April’s big sister Annabel is her best friend, even though she’s older. “Once I brought Annabel to my school for show-and-tell,” she confides. “And once she brought me to her office to staple papers together.” But when Annabel’s boyfriend Harold proposes, April is pretty upset. Even though she gets to be flower girl and help Annabel pick out her wedding dress, she tries to sabotage the whole thing in regular kid ways: she spills ketchup on Harold and hides her pet snake in the bathroom when he goes to clean up. But the day of the wedding, when the ring pops from the best man’s hand to roll out of sight, it’s April who spots it and saves the day. And when she goes up to her now single room, she finds a very loving note from her sister and her husband, promising sleepovers—and mallomars. The illustrations are energetic ink-and-watercolors, full of roses and wedding paraphernalia, and the sisters, while far apart in age, share red hair and impish expressions. Pair with Gary Soto’s Snapshots from the Wedding (1997) for a child’s-eye look at a family celebration. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 31, 2001

ISBN: 0-06-028809-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2001

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MY ROTTEN REDHEADED OLDER BROTHER

Patricia has an older brother who looks "like a weasel with glasses," but that's just for starters. The real problem with him — besides his red wiry hair and his freckles — is that he's always telling her he can do everything better than she can. He can pick more blackberries, he can eat more rhubarb without puckering; he can run faster, climb higher, burp louder, and spit farther. Worst of all, he's four years older, "always has been and always will be." When Patricia's babushka — her grandmother — teaches her how to wish on a falling star, Patricia wishes to do something better than he does. She gets her wish and winds up seeing a different side of her brother as well. Polacco's (Babushka Baba Yaga, 1993, etc.; Pink and Say, see below) text is smooth, effortless, and completely natural-sounding. Her drawings are funny and vivacious — as usual, her characters are drawn with wonderful facial expressions and limbs akimbo. She has the ability to transport you to her settings — in this case, to a Michigan farm where you can practically feel the sun and smell the pies baking. Polacco has proved time and again that she is masterful both as illustrator and storyteller, and this book is no exception. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1994

ISBN: 0-671-72751-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1994

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The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will...

HOW TO SCARE A GHOST

From the How To... series

Reagan and Wildish continue their How to… series with this Halloween-themed title.

If you’ve ever had a hankering to scare a ghost, this handbook is what you need. In it, a pair of siblings shows readers “how to attract a ghost” (they like creepily carved pumpkins and glitter), identify a ghost (real ghosts “never, ever open doors”), and scare a ghost (making faces, telling scary stories). Also included is a warning not to go too far—a vacuum is over-the-top on the scary chart for ghosts. Once you’ve calmed your ghost again, it’s time to play (just not hide-and-seek or on a trampoline) and then decide on costumes for trick-or-treating. Your ghost will also need to learn Halloween etiquette (knocking instead of floating through doors). The title seems a little misleading considering only two spreads are dedicated to trying to scare a ghost, but the package as a whole is entertaining. Wildish’s digital cartoon illustrations are as bright as ever, and the brother and sister duo have especially expressive faces. Both are white-presenting, as are all the other characters except for some kids in the very last spread.

The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will be clean from all the vacuuming. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 21, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-0190-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: July 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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