CHI-KEETA AND PUK-WUDJIS by Mabel V. Hoadley

CHI-KEETA AND PUK-WUDJIS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A fairy-folk-tale set in the Southwest follows the strange journey taken by Chi-keeta, daughter of an exiled chief, as-under the guidance of the Brownie-like Puk-Wudjis, she goes on a rescue mission. Impatiently, she is forced to accept delays on the route to the Black Mountains, while her little guides help the good and punish the wicked with their potent magic. The story is presumably contemporary, but the situation of the Indian of the Southwest is gives vague treatment, while unexplained references to Indian agents and tourists, and superficial characterisation, detract from an illusion of authenticity so essential in fantasy for the eight to eleven year olds. While some of the younger in this group may be lured by glimpses of the canyons, the sounds, smells, and wild life of the steaming desert, on the whole this goblin tale will seem old stuff to the Gremlin age. Large readable type- for second year readers- but unimaginative, sentimental illustrations detract from the general format.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1950
Publisher: Caxton