THE GOOD FAMILY by MacKinlay Kantor

THE GOOD FAMILY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This seems to lack the integration and rounded quality of most of MacKinlay Kantor's writing- almost it reads like the skeleton of a larger project rather than a finished book. The story begins and ends with an unusual situation- a young wife, faced with poverty which does not seem to include the possibility of children, decides on an abortion, sells her engagement ring to pay for it, and then, as a result of a panoramic dream under the preliminary sedative, faces the crime of her decision and escapes. The main story briskly sketches the next eighteen years, as the twins bring delight and glory to their parents, as fate offers successive advancement and the ultimate goal. Nice human touches of life in a small town -- of young marrieds and problems of budget, children, entertainment and so on. But one feels that at no point does he cut below the surface of a superficial story of a happy marriage and parenthood.

Pub Date: April 25th, 1949
Publisher: Coward-McCann