EDWARD, BENJAMIN & BUTTER by Malcolm Hall

EDWARD, BENJAMIN & BUTTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Edward Tapir tries to play a trick on his gloomy friend Benjamin Horse, to cheer him up--but Benjamin turns the tables on Edward, and that cheers him up. It's one of those transparent fabrications composed of one after another unpredictable plot complication--and redeemed, in this instance, only by the author's ability to make each development clear. Edward's intention is to hide a bag of butter under the unwitting Benjamin's bed, then appear for breakfast and, when Benjamin yearns for some butter for their oatcakes, produce it by magic. (Why Benjamin is always butter-less, we don't hear.) But when Edward looks under the bed--to Benjamin's scoffing--the butter is gone; and there's a ""very fat kitten."" But the kitten couldn't have eaten the butter because--says Edward, after plopping it on the bathroom scale--it ""weighs exactly one pound,"" the same as the butter. Benjamin smiles and shrugs; Edward is suspicious. And eventually it comes out that Benjamin heard Edward sneaking in, ""found the butter and put it on the oatcakes."" ""Then I covered them up."" So there it is--and the buttered oatcakes are ""delicious."" Whether they're worth all the to-do, though, is another question.

Pub Date: March 27th, 1981
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan