THE MOST OF MALCOLM MUGGERIDGE by Malcolm Muggeridge

THE MOST OF MALCOLM MUGGERIDGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Malcolm Muggeridge is an international iconoclast and this is a retrospective of his essays. In it, one can find opinions as: references to Queen Elizabeth such as, ""The fragile shoulders that bear the burden of an Empire,"" are absolute rot; that the post-assassination articles on JFK include all too much pure bunkum; that P. G. Wodehouse's cooperation in Nazi radio broadcasts was an overrated misunderstanding; that American society is sex-drenched; that his ex-employer Lord Beaverbrook was a portentous bore, No logical mind questions these things, but all of these have created a degree of controversy surrounding Muggeridge. It's the man's unerring instinct for the centers of emotional unreason and his perfect willingness to overturn such public monuments as the Royal Family that has kept his career sizzling with day-to-day conflicts. He once edited Punch, the famous humor magazine, and found it a gloomy chore. He's also been a popular TV panelist and moderator, often accused of tastelessness but always watched. What he most reverences is his right to speak the truth as he sees it and he has a laj dary way with a phrase, delivered in a tone halfway between a hoot and a razzberry. He's better at contentious criticism than John O'Hara, ex-columnist (see My Turn, p. 165). His mannered impertinences are excellent examples of gadfly social criticism at the popular level.

Pub Date: June 24th, 1966
Publisher: Simon & Schuster