THE BURNING CANDLE by Mara Kay

THE BURNING CANDLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Anti-communism fuels The Burning Candle, and whereas thought control and terrorism are always valid targets, it is neither reasonable nor relevant to use 1946 Yugoslavia as a prototype of oppression, to identify the Royalists as freedom fighters, the Titoists as blackguards: history does not substantiate the dichotomy and later events make it misleading. The plot exists here simply to serve the author's purpose: seventeen-year-old Zora helps her lover escape to Trieste, sees her party member brother, who seemed impervious to private honor, recant and go to prison, and herself foregoes a chance to win a French scholarship rather than defame a religious tradition. The communists are uniformly puppets who prate slogans and exploit hardship. After the thaw in the Cold War, an arid deep-freeze.

Pub Date: May 27th, 1968
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard