THE MINE OF LOST DAYS by Marc Brandel

THE MINE OF LOST DAYS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Henry Travers is a kid of indeterminate age and he's regressing into childhood compulsions because his Aunt Penelope is preoccupied clinking away at her abstract sculptures in the barn and American Henry can't understand the accents of anyone else in this part of western Ireland. Then he falls into an abandoned copper mine and discovers some people he can understand -- Shana O'Neill and friends who've been hiding in there ever since the great famine and maintaining themselves (as young as ever) in a world they create by ""thinking it."" Shana wants Henry to search for her brother Kevin who left the mine ""several weeks before,"" and Henry who can't bear to tell Shana the truth about the world outside obligingly thought-projects the whole crew back to 19th century America where he finds Kevin -- but not before Shana shoots Henry's own great grandfather -- an act Henry fears will time warp him right out of existence. For some reason if doesn't, and Henry's worse mistakes (like feeding a nosy mining engineer to the imaginary but bonecrushing Ulalus) are erased on his second time around. . . . It's all no better executed than it needs to be, but Brandel's unstinting imagination inspires awe. Anyone susceptible to the notion of clairvoyant Irish ghosts is sure to hang on even when the going gets slippery.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1974
Publisher: Lippincott