THE INNOCENT WAYFARING by Marchette Chute

THE INNOCENT WAYFARING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It is hard to put one's finger on the reasons why this story doesn't quite come off. Perhaps it is because one's interest is divided. First, there is the story of two runaways, -- a girl, high born and gently reared, who runs away from a convent where she is being trained for matrimony -- or the veil; and a boy, of cruder background who rejects trade for the arts and the freedom of the highways. They meet at a fair - they join forces and have a series of adventures before they are rounded up and brought back to the manor house at Rotheby, where the parents agree to eventual union. So much for story interest. Now for period and background. It is a tale of 14th century England, and the trappings are there, but there is no real feel of the period in the manner of telling. Probably this is deliberate, but it seems to me to weaken the sincerity of the story, for the background seems unreal stage setting, and the characters, the dialogue, even the allusions have a somewhat ironic flavor. It is a lovely looking book, with decorations by the author.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1943
Publisher: Scribner