CROWS ARE BLACK EVERYWHERE by

CROWS ARE BLACK EVERYWHERE

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

An intricate story of espionage and counterespionage in Chungking, in which are involved an American girl reporter, who wants to be impartial -- and finds she cannot; Bill, instructor of Chinese fighter pilots, and Tina, his Eurasian mistress, whose half brother is Wang, of doubtful patriotism; Fritz, a German-American who has designs on Pggy; and various other expatriates, sies and loyal Chinese. Intricate as the ramifications of the plot turn out to be, the story somehow does not keep up the sustained pace and excitement one would expect from the multiplicity of mysterious happenings, the tenseness of the waiting period when the location of the key to a new cipher means success or failure. The cipher material is the best part of the book, as it should be in the hands of Herbert Yardley, author of The American Black Chamber, authoritative book on the subject. Background of Chinese life, of venality in high places, shows familiarity with the scene. Plus market in mystery and spy department.

Publisher: Putnam