THE ANIMALS IN THAT COUNTRY by Margaret Atwood

THE ANIMALS IN THAT COUNTRY

KIRKUS REVIEW

These generally brief poems peregrinate wittily--an impression of discoveries as neat and exquisite as the calligraphy of fox footprints in the snow. Miss Atwood exploits the wily feminine in a cleancut delicacy of line and verse. In her title poem, the innocent declaration "In that country the animals have the faces of people" is followed by a tapestry of gleaming images: "the ceremonial cat possessing the streets" or, extending the line and fancy, "the bull, embroidered/ with blood and given/ an elegant death, trumpets, his name stamped on him, heraldic brand." The poems, on a variety of miniatured subjects, are both oblique in intent and attractively crystalline in expression.
Pub Date: Jan. 16th, 1968
Publisher: Little, Brown
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1st, 1968




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