THE PICTURE LIFE OF THURGOOD MARSHALL by Margaret B. Young

THE PICTURE LIFE OF THURGOOD MARSHALL

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

What little life there is, is in the pictures; otherwise ""Thurgood Marshall's many jobs were like steps on a ladder"" that resembles an escalator here -- smooth, with hardly a sense even of striving or strife. In one after another post he tries ""to get equal rights for black people"" (p. 21), ""equal rights for Negro citizens"" (p. 22), ""rights of Negro citizens"" (p. 24), etc.; ""some of the cases that Marshall and the NAACP won for black citizens"" are listed. His very boyhood scrapes (related with relish in Fenderson's 1969 biography) come to good: ""The principal punished Thurgood by making him read the Constitution. In this way he learned a lot about the highest law in the United States."" We wonder; it sounds too Thorough Good for any man -- including the grandfather who supplied those as the two names required by the Union Army, a bit of information that's among what's missing here.

Pub Date: Feb. 22nd, 1971
Publisher: Watts