FIRST BOOK OF AMERICAN NEGROES by Margaret B. Young

FIRST BOOK OF AMERICAN NEGROES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Classify this under Race Relations; color it neutral. It's not history, not collective biography, simply a superficial essay on the problems of the Negro, how they came to be (Tradition! Tradition!), how they may be solved (time, good will, understanding). A delicate balance is maintained by straddling the fence: on the Underground Railroad-- ""North and South, Negroes and whites, made it possible for many slaves to escape...;"" on Reconstruction -- ""there are many conflicting reports of this period in history books, but it was a time of great economic problems, corrupt government in which some cases Negroes were a part, and much lingering hatred;"" on school integration -- ""This decision (the Supreme Court) has resulted in many northern and southern states reorganizing their schools so that Negro and white children may attend together."" Even the occasional sharp statement is dulled by some explanation, some excuse. The sections on current Negro achievements in various fields introduces a number of new names, but the introductions are brief. The decision: token information, at best.

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1966
Publisher: Watts