PARTOUCHE PLANTS A SEED by

PARTOUCHE PLANTS A SEED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Partouche is pink and plump as a French pig should be. His story is drawn in heavily sketched black lines filled with the lightest of colors. Partouche's small adventure starts well. He is pig-headed. He insists on planting a seed of corn to make a garden of his own in the most inappropriate places around a railroad yard. He thinks he's outsmarting the woman who owns him, Madame Gounard. The youngest readers will give in readily to the artfully induced sense of reader superiority and think Partouche is quite funny as he resists the sweet reason of his friend Raymond, the fieldmouse, whose planting advice he always ignores. Finally, the much-moved cornstalk halts a train and produces a crisis amongst the authorities. Partouche at last heeds Raymond and sneaks the corn into Madame's garden while the officials continue to dispute. (Start of French stereotype, end of Partouche's appeal.) It peters out, as so many others end--Madame, Partouche and mouse have a picnic together and eat the corn. Ragout de porc storytelling; filet mignon illustrations.

Pub Date: Aug. 17th, 1966
Publisher: Harper & Row