PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERACY by Margaret Green

PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERACY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The author employs the same approach to Jefferson Davis that she used in covering the life of Andrew Johnson, Defender of the Constitution (p. 59- J 25-1962). That is, she examines the standard picture and attempts to portray the whole man, with the lesser-known virtues in place next to the better-known vices. Thus, the Davis accomplishments before the Civil War, his great intellect and his ability as an organizer -- all receive deserved attention. Mrs. Green does a better job of illuminating Southern political attitudes and issues than she does of humanizing Davis, but no biographer at any level quite manages that. There is some fictional conversation, but nothing important -- it never changes the course of history, at any rate. Davis' second wife, the dramatic Varina, comes up as pure cardboard. This is unfortunate. It leaves Davis stage center at all times. Even Davis wasn't that much the lonely hero.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1963
Publisher: Messner