WHERE STANDS A WINGED SENTRY by Margaret Kennedy
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WHERE STANDS A WINGED SENTRY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There have been, there are, and there will be so many books about England at war, about localized or general reactions, that it is very difficult to maintain any discrimination. They're all somewhat good, but this new one, subjectively and objectively, is very good. Margaret Kennedy, the novelist, writes of ""what I have myself seen, heard, thought and felt, from day to day"" --over the summer months of 1940. What gives her book its edge is its emotional frankness (and emotion is rare in these English accounts), her personal moods of fright and despondency, growing apprehension at waiting -- waiting for invasion, and eventually when she, with the rest of the country, spiritually finds her feet. Her life with her children and Nanny, first in Surrey, then in the Ce coastal village of Porthmerryn, refugees, evacuees, air raid alarms, etc. make nice personalized reading. But in addition to this, there is much which is intellectually stimulating, and a sharp emotionalism which gives the book its hold, makes it very near, very real.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1941
Publisher: Yale