A CROWN FOR THOMAS PETERS by

A CROWN FOR THOMAS PETERS

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

There are some fascinating insights into the historical backgrounds of racial conflict in this fictional biography. Thomas Peters was a magnificent Negro whose accomplishments would be considered outstanding in any age. Against the back-drop of 18th century inequality, injustice and accepted inhumanity, they loom even larger. He was a free Nigerian, made a slave, effected a successful escape and helped to turn the former slave trading port of Sierra Leone (""The Devil's Post Office"") into Freetown, a purchased legal grant of land for free Negro settlers. The crown of the title refers to the gold one used in the ceremony surrounding Tom's installation as Freetown's first mayor in 1761. The book offers criticism and admiration to those white men who deserved blame or praise for their parts in the procuring of slaves or in the abolition of the traffic in Great Britain and the United States. A well written book that will be welcomed by librarians and teachers as well as readers.

Pub Date: April 13th, 1964
Publisher: Washburn