THE CHANTING OF CHILDREN by Margaret Sand

THE CHANTING OF CHILDREN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An early contender for drippiest heroine of the year is Claire Fontaine, a recent widow who is returning to her hometown to clear up an inheritance left her by a newly dead aunt. She gets lost, arriving at night in her car, and in a wooded lane is approached by a ghostly troupe of five chanting children. Next day she learns that a child has disappeared in town. Then a police captain repeatedly starts showing up at the house to question her. And, because Claire harbors various guilts (did she cause the osteomyelitis that killed her twin sister long ago?) and because she has found a bracelet belonging to the missing girl (it was around the neck of her dead sister's doll in a chest!), these interrogations come on like Daughter of Crime and Punishment. Needless to say, there is no other resemblance between Dostoevsky and this bland and amateurish would-be shocker.

Pub Date: April 25th, 1978
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan