THE WAR: A Memoir by Marguerite Duras
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THE WAR: A Memoir

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This 1944 diary of a young Resistance member, written during the last days of the French occupation and the first days of the liberation, is only now being published--Duras says she forgot about it during the intervening years, and only recently rediscovered it in a cupboard. The loneliness and ambivalence of love and war have appeared in Duras' work before, from The Lover to Hiroshima Mon Amour, in which a Frenchwoman reveals to her Japanese lover, after the bomb, that she was tortured and imprisoned in postwar France for her affair with a German soldier. In the first section of The War, Duras the heroine waits for her husband to return from the Belsen concentration camp. When De Gaulle (""by definition leader of the Right--"") says, ""The days of weeping are over. The days of glory have returned,"" Duras says, ""We shall never forgive him."" It's because he's denying the people's loss. When her husband returns, she has to hide the cake she baked for him, because the weight of food in his system can kill. (We are spared no detail of his physical degradation, even to being told the color of his stools.) When he is stronger, she tells him she is divorcing him to marry another Resistance member. In the second section, set earlier, at the time of her husband's arrest, a Gestapo official plays a cat-and-mouse game with Duras, to whom he's attracted, preying on her desperation to help her husband. In the third section, post-liberation, she switches roles, becomes an interrogator as Resistance members torture a Nazi informer. She also half-falls in love (with characteristic Duras dualism) with a young prisoner who childishly joined the collaborationist forces out of nothing more than a passion for fast cars and guns. In her preface, Duras says it ""appalls"" her to reread this memoir, because it is so much more important than her literary work. Certainly, like everything she has written in her spare, impassive voice, the book is at once elegant and brutal in its honesty: in her world, we are all outcasts, and the word ""liberation"" is never free of irony. A powerful, moving work.

Pub Date: April 30th, 1986
Publisher: Pantheon