PEEP!

A LITTLE BOOK ABOUT TAKING A LEAP

The author/illustrator of Splash! A Little Book About Bouncing Back (9/08) offers another diminutive dose of biblio–behavior-modeling. Already anxious about a green balloon that seems to be following along, a small chick comes to a curb from which his mother and sisters have already hopped and gets stuck. After several false starts and much urging he nerves himself at last to make the jump, but his triumph is short-lived; not only does the balloon suddenly burst, but then little Peep is left behind again when everyone else hops up over another curb. The new obstacle looks impossibly high in Van Lieshout’s very simple yellow-and-black line drawings, and seeing little Peep in an even more challenging new plight isn’t likely to give very young children a positive impression. Emotions are writ large here despite the small trim size, but fear-dispellers like Jane Simmons’s Come Along, Daisy! (1998) or Martin Waddell’s Tiny’s Big Adventure, illustrated by John Lawrence (2004), will provide more convincing reassurance. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-312-36915-6

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2009

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Adults will do better skipping the book and talking with their children.

AN ABC OF EQUALITY

Social-equity themes are presented to children in ABC format.

Terms related to intersectional inequality, such as “class,” “gender,” “privilege,” “oppression,” “race,” and “sex,” as well as other topics important to social justice such as “feminism,” “human being,” “immigration,” “justice,” “kindness,” “multicultural,” “transgender,” “understanding,” and “value” are named and explained. There are 26 in all, one for each letter of the alphabet. Colorful two-page spreads with kid-friendly illustrations present each term. First the term is described: “Belief is when you are confident something exists even if you can’t see it. Lots of different beliefs fill the world, and no single belief is right for everyone.” On the facing page it concludes: “B is for BELIEF / Everyone has different beliefs.” It is hard to see who the intended audience for this little board book is. Babies and toddlers are busy learning the names for their body parts, familiar objects around them, and perhaps some basic feelings like happy, hungry, and sad; slightly older preschoolers will probably be bewildered by explanations such as: “A value is an expression of how to live a belief. A value can serve as a guide for how you behave around other human beings. / V is for VALUE / Live your beliefs out loud.”

Adults will do better skipping the book and talking with their children. (Board book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-78603-742-8

Page Count: 52

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review Posted Online: Sept. 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2019

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ISH

A lovely tale about the trials of a budding artist brought to us by the author/illustrator of Dot (2003). Ramon creates drawings at a furious pace. Everywhere he goes, he draws. But there’s nothing like a derisive older brother to put the kibosh on a sensitive artist type. Suddenly, Ramon becomes self-critical. He cannot satisfy his own desire to get things “right” anymore, so he decides to put away his pencil for good. Luckily another family member, his sister, has secretly been collecting Ramon’s art for her own private gallery. She convinces him that a successful drawing need not be a perfect reflection of reality. It’s okay if a house looks house-ish or a fish looks fish-ish. It is just the liberating sentiment Ramon needs to reignite his creativity. Told in spare prose with Reynolds’s signature line drawings in watercolor, ink, and tea, Ish will encourage other little artists. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-7636-2344-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2004

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