AMERICAN CATTLE TRAILS, EAST AND WEST by Marian T. Place

AMERICAN CATTLE TRAILS, EAST AND WEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Is this trip necessary? Yes--despite the numerous juvenile titles on this subject, this one merits consideration for its smoothly-written, comprehensive coverage of cattle raising and cattle driving from colonial times to the twentieth century, from the Bay State Cow Path to Nelson Story and ""the longest cattle drive in history."" The story develops as an aspect of American territorial and economic advancement; it holds interest in its own right as the experience of men, singly and as part of a team. The author uses original accounts and descriptive detail to give immediacy: a cowboy's neckerchief, for example, ""was used to cover nose and mouth from heavy dust or freezing sleet, to tie down a hat, as a towel, mop, bronc blindfold, hobble, sling, tourniquet, bandage, and signal marker, but seldom to wipe a man's nose!"" Of the other general books available, Cowboys and Cattle Drives is younger, Cowboys and Cattle Country is older: this is a good middle route that covers more ground and delivers more than just meat.

Pub Date: Jan. 19th, 1966
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston