WHEN DOCTORS ARE PATIENTS by

WHEN DOCTORS ARE PATIENTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A collection of some thirty odd case histories, in the first person this time, which record the ""subjective experience of disease"" and the interaction of disease and personality as undergone by medical men and with presumably a greater awareness of what is involved. Among the contributors, Fredric Wertham, Abraham Myerson, and Henry E. Sigerist are the more familiar names, and it is the psychiatrists who -- not unexpectedly provide the most complete clinical picture of their responses to disease, and fulfill the intention here which is to show the psychogenic nature of illness. From the undisguised diagnosis, to the adaptation thereto, these records show the way in which severe dangers- and handicaps- have been met; heart trouble and hypertension, blindness and deafness, epilepsy and polio, migraines and allergies, T.B. and multiple sclerosis, addictions to alcohol and narcotics, pain, old age, etc. And the object lesson of the ""Physician, heal thyself"" has a certain inspirational value as well as pathological interest for those who are directly- or indirectly- concerned with illness.

Pub Date: March 24th, 1952
Publisher: Norton