TEACHING THE SLOW-LEARNING CHILD by Marion Funk Smith

TEACHING THE SLOW-LEARNING CHILD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mrs. Smith's book about the ""educable retarded""- the children whose IQ range is from 50 to 90, has been written for parents as well as other teachers- in an attempt to equalize the educational opportunities of the slow-learning child who is more usually stigmatized. Based on her own teaching experience, this is a demonstration that the slow-learner can learn, if no undue pressure brought to bear, but it is also a sorry spectacle of this type of child who is usually shunted from class to class- and shamed at home. The program she follows- in which the acquisition of a reading skill is emphasized; the importance of patience and an ordered discipline; the elimination of segregation in the school itself; the right social and teaching attitudes- all is part of this picture of the child who presents his special problems- and rewards- and which is warmed by her sympathy and dedicated understanding. Not a how-to-do-it book.

Publisher: Harper