THE MIDSHIPMAN AND THE RAJAH by Marjorie Phillips

THE MIDSHIPMAN AND THE RAJAH

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The reader is thrown headlong (the background for the events is eventually given in bits and pieces) into a disjointed tale about Tim, a young seaworthy chap, his hardy uncle, and his father, the Rajah of Netwal. Tim is depressed when he learns that he must give up the salty, rugged life of the ship, to stay in Netwal amidst gaudy silks and perfumes, with his father. In a battle, Tim proves his ability as a fighter and leader; his father realizes that the lad will benefit from the midshipman life, and happily Tim leaves with his uncle-- with the possibility of returning when he is older. Whether the setting is a bulky region of fantasy, or a fluffy unenchanting paradise on earth, the tale seems to exist in an annoying vacuum-- the reader can neither see the characters at a close range as real people, nor from a refreshing distance as carefree wanderers; they can only be thought of as poor players in a disastrous flop.

Pub Date: June 3rd, 1963
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill